Morning Mashup 04/24

Morning Mashup

A daily mashup of book recommendations, articles, and videos for your information, edification, and enjoyment.


BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS

The Tech-Wise Family: Everyday Steps for Putting Technology in Its Proper Place | Andy Crouch

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Reset: Living a Grace-Paced Life in a Burnout Culture | David Murray

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ARTICLES

A Legacy of Forgiveness | The Washington Post

Jemar TisbyHe was walking home from an Easter meal on Sunday when a man walked up to Robert Godwin Sr., asked him to say a name and then shot him in the head. To add to the horror, the killer recorded the shooting and uploaded it to Facebook. Thousands of people saw the slaying before it was removed over an hour later.

The family’s grief, particularly that of Godwin’s children, was on display, too. But so was their love. In a baffling demonstration of grace, three of his children publicly forgave their father’s killer the next day.

Is the Enemy of My Enemy My Friend?| Ligonier

Albert Mohler: In a time of cultural conflict, the enemy of our enemy may well be our friend. But, with eternity in view and the gospel at stake, the enemy of our enemy must not be confused to be a friend to the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Truthing in Love | GoThereFor

Lionel Windsor: Truthing in love means speaking the gospel, speaking the implications of the gospel, and speaking in a gospel-shaped way within the whole network of loving relationships characterized by God’s love for us in Jesus.

Three Lessons from an Intentional Life | ERLC

Lauren McAfee: I have the privilege of working in the company that grandpa started more than 40 years ago. There are many things I’ve learned from him over the years, but here are three specific lessons I’ve gleaned from his life:

10 Reasons to Be Humble Toward Opponents | TGC

Andrew DavisGod doesn’t will for us to give in for an instant on issues of biblical truth. It’s not humilty but self-serving cowardice that causes us to back down from doctrinal attacks. We must fight like lions for the truth of the gospel—the souls of our hearers are at stake. 

I think it’s unlikely for a work of church revitalization to go on without overcoming significant human opposition. But God commands us to be humble toward our opponents, entrusting ourselves to him. This is among the greatest displays of grace. And it’ll be instrumental in transforming your church.

As personal conduct goes, I believe there are at least 10 reasons we should be humble toward our opponents.

VIDEOS

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Morning Mashup 08/16

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A daily mashup of Kindle deals, articles, and videos for your information, edification, and enjoyment.


KINDLE DEALS

Brothers, We Are Not Professionals: A Plea to Pastors for Radical Ministry, Updated and Expanded Edition | John Piper | $0.99

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Read the Bible for Life: Your Guide to Understanding and Living God’s Word | George Guthrie | $2.99

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The Insanity of God: A True Story of Faith Resurrected | Nik Ripken | $0.99

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The Insanity of Obedience: Walking with Jesus in Tough Places | Nik Ripken | $0.99

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ARTICLES

Greater Than Gold | David Boudia

The thought of another Olympics and the potential aftermath intimidates me a little. I’ve walked through the challenges that came in the aftermath of a gold medal in London, and I know how easy it is to believe the lies that come with such exposure. I understand now, however, what to expect if God chooses to put me in the position to win gold again. I hope you’ve encountered something in my story that connects to your life and your circumstances. Allow me to leave you with a few final encouragements that God has revealed to me and that have been beneficial to my walk…

The Watchmen | Alan Jacobs

Excellent essay on Christian intellectuals.

The Value of Marrying Young | Albert Mohler

Albert Mohler explains how our culture devalues marriage and why young people delay matrimony. He encourages Christians to avoid this societal trend by marrying young and pursuing adulthood as a couple.

Read Books of the Bible in One Sitting | Andy Naselli

Here’s my latest ally for why you should read books of the Bible in one sitting…

Your Church is Not Your Platform | Timothy Paul Jones

It is a privilege to lead the people of God—but the privilege of being a leader of God’s people never transforms the people into the leader’s property. 

The One Really Good Reason I Serve in Children’s Ministry | Aaron Armstrong

I serve in children’s ministry because I get to teach kids the Bible and be a part of making disciples. Children’s ministry is not (or shouldn’t be) the church’s babysitting ministry. It’s not telling nice stories where you’re a David or a Daniel. It is intentional evangelism and discipleship.

VIDEOS

Morning Mashup 04/22

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A mashup of book deals, articles, and videos for your information, edification, and enjoyment.


BOOK DEALS

11 books in the Christ-Centered Exposition Commentary Series for just $2.99

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Edited by Danny Akin, Tony Merida, and David Platt, these books are currently on sale for Kindle at $2.99. Take advantage of this great offer!

Same-Sex Attraction and the Church by Ed Shaw ($2.99)

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Recovering Redemption by Matt Chandler ($2.99)

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The Gospel-Driven Life by Michael Horton ($2.99)

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ARTICLES

The Secret History of Tiger Woods – Long, but compelling piece on the unraveling of Tiger Woods.

5 Reasons Why the New Calvinism is Worth Supporting – Love this honest and encouraging article from Jeffrey Jue, provost of Westminster Theological Seminary.

The Birds, the Bees, the Awe, the Wonder – Tim Challies shows how “the talk” is more than parental responsibility; it’s parental privilege as well.

The Pastor’s Typical Week – Convicting and sound advice for pastors.

9 Marks of Healthy Biblical Complementarianism – Kevin DeYoung: “The core of complementarianism is not up for discussion. How we talk about complementarianism is. And how we practice complementarianism too. Is the problem that we lack courage or that we are missing compassion? Have we gotten too soft? Or have we gotten too restrictive? Does complementarianism need a re-branding, a reformation, a revival, or a retrieval?”

A Pastor’s Reading Plan – What should be part of a pastor’s regular reading?

$5 Friday from Ligonier – Wonderful resources from Ligonier for $5.

VIDEOS

Morning Mashup 03/29

A mashup of book deals, articles, and videos for your information, edification, and enjoyment.


Book Deals

Articles

How Do We Relate to Superman? – Aaron Armstrong reflects on the new Batman vs. Superman movie and how we identify with the Man of Steel.

The Collected Letters of C.S. Lewis – And all Lewis admirers said, Amen.

The Tragedy of the Resurrection – Beautiful piece from Carl Trueman on the often overlooked tragic elements in Christian theology, particularly the resurrection. He writes, “The lack of a sense of the tragic in Christian worship indicates a lack of biblical balance in the liturgies of today’s services.”

Has Ken Ham Embraced Evolution? – Dr. Kenneth Keathley of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary believes so. Tim Challies disagrees in this article.

Baptists and the Benedict Option in American Babylon – This article by Nathan Finn is worth reading a few times over.

Did the Second Person of the Trinity Die? – I believe Mark Jones convincingly refutes R.C. Sproul’s Christological belief that only Jesus’ humanity suffered death.

A Biblical Theology of the Resurrection – D.A. Carson at his best.

Videos


“We cannot serve God and the world at the same time. It is vain to attempt it. The thing cannot be done.”

— J.C. Ryle

Morning Mashup 09/25

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A mashup of articles for your information, edification, entertainment, and enjoyment.


Hajj Stampede Near Mecca Leaves Over 700 Dead – Horrible tragedy. Praying for the families of those affected.

9 Marks of a Generous Giver – Comprehensive and concise article on the Christian and giving. “The first three marks involve where your giving goes; the next three tease out heart motives in your giving; and the final three explore dynamics between your giving and Caesar (as well as non-profits you support).”

Why Don’t Protestants Have a Pope? – With Pope Francis in the States, Kevin DeYoung answers an important question with some help from Herman Bavinck.

How to Read the Bible and Do Theology Well – Don Carson: “Although we cannot know anything with the perfection of God’s knowledge (his knowledge is absolutely exhaustive!), yet because God has disclosed things, we can know those things truly.”

Pastoring Rappers – Richard Clark interviews the artists of Humble Beast.

Some Thoughts on the Reading of Books – Albert Mohler shares his reading habits and strategies while offering some suggestions on how to make the most of books.

Speaker Boehner to Resign at End of October – Reaction from Republican leaders varies, but there is a clear commitment to preventing a government shut down.

15 Key Quotes from Pope Francis’ Address to the United Nations – “In the lengthy address Pope Francis covers a wide range of topics, from the rule of law to nuclear weapons to the drug trade. Here are 15 key quotes from the speech.”

God’s unconditional love poured out in our heart is the unique force impelling us to love him and others. –G.K. Beale

Quick Quotes: 12 Quotes from “Reflections on the Psalms” by C.S. Lewis

Q-train-logoEvery Friday, I plan to share select quotes from a book I am either currently reading or have previously read. Few things have impacted my faith and life as much as reading has. This will be just one way I promote books and reading. These articles will be for the dedicated reader who loves to gain insight from as many books as possible. They will also be for the Christian looking for new books to read. I am always on the lookout for new books to read. Hopefully some things I share will lead you to pick up a new book. Finally, these articles will be for those of you too busy to read. Hopefully these quick quotes will provide you with easy access to books you would otherwise not have time to read. Each article will include a brief discussion of the author and his work followed by ten (or more) pertinent quotes from the book. 


C.S. Lewis has become one of my favorite authors. One of the things I love most about Lewis is his candor and honesty. It comes across as false modesty, but it isn’t. Lewis is sincere, but his frequent confessions of struggling with a certain idea or topic or biblical truth is refreshing and educational for a young minister and writer like myself. As much as I learn from Lewis’s insights, I learn even more from his demeanor and tone. It helps that he is a colossal writer. Not many since Lewis can say they are in his class of writers.

91L1rEe7EpLI began reading Reflections on the Psalms because my pastor has been preaching through various psalms over the past few weeks. We are heading into the final week of that series, and as the children’s pastor I have been preparing and preaching sermons to the kids of our church on the same texts my pastor has been preaching to the rest of the congregation. Walking with Lewis through various themes, ideas, tensions, and truths in the psalms has been a delight. This book is in a class of its own. It’s not a commentary. It’s not a devotional. It’s not a collection of essays. It is one man’s reflections on one of the most popular and impactful books of the Bible. Through penetrating prose, Lewis probes our hearts and while he definitely reflects on many psalms, his work is more a reflection on the human condition than anything else. The Psalms are like a mirror, which simultaneously exposes our true selves while reflecting the glory of God. Lewis’ Reflections on the Psalms holds that mirror up so we can better see.

Here are twelve important quotes from Reflections on the Psalms to whet your appetite:

1. A man can’t be always defending the truth; there must be a time to feed on it.

2. The most valuable thing the Psalms do for me is to express that same delight in God which made David dance.

3. [The Law is] like mountain water, like fresh air after a dungeon, like sanity after a nightmare.

4. I take [Psalm 19] to be the greatest poem in the Psalter and one of the greatest lyrics in the world.

5. In so far as this idea of the Law’s beauty, sweetness, or preciousness, arose from the contrast of the surrounding Paganisms, we may soon find occasion to recover it.

6. Fully to enjoy is to glorify. In commanding us to glorify Him, God is inviting us to enjoy Him.

7. If it were possible for a created soul fully to “appreciate,” that is to love and delight in, the worthiest object of all, and simultaneously at every moment to give this delight perfect expression, then that soul would be in supreme beatitude.

8. Our “services” both in their conduct and and in our power to participate, are merely attempts at worship.

9. I think we delight to praise what we enjoy because the praise not merely expresses but completes the enjoyment; it is its appointed consummation.

10. I had not noticed how the humblest, and at the same time most balanced and capacious, minds, praised most, while the cranks, misfits and malcontents praised least.

11. It is not out of compliment that lovers keep on telling one another how beautiful they are; the delight is incomplete till it is expressed.

12. These conjectures as to why God does what He does are probably of no more value than my dog’s ideas of what I am up to when I sit and read.


396110_519885398036913_1852978654_nMathew Gilbert (B.A. Boyce College) is the Children’s Pastor at First Baptist Church in East Bernstadt, KY. He is an M.Div student at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Mathew lives in London, KY with his wife, Erica, and their son, Jude Adoniram.

Quick Quotes: 25 Quotes from “Preaching” by Tim Keller

Q-train-logoEvery Friday, I plan to share select quotes from a book I am either currently reading or have previously read. Few things have impacted my faith and life as much as reading has. This will be just one way I promote books and reading. These articles will be for the dedicated reader who loves to gain insight from as many books as possible. They will also be for the Christian looking for new books to read. I am always on the lookout for new books to read. Hopefully some things I share will lead you to pick up a new book. Finally, these articles will be for those of you too busy to read. Hopefully these quick quotes will provide you with easy access to books you would otherwise not have time to read. Each article will include a brief discussion of the author and his work followed by ten (or more) pertinent quotes from the book. 


The regret I have about reading Tim Keller this year is that I am just now reading Tim Keller. He is one of the most profound writers and preachers of the last 50 years. He effectively reaches people not many people or churches are reaching. He is highly appealing to liberals without being liberal. He has led a growing and flourishing church in Manhattan since the 1980s. Keller writes and speaks intelligently and is one of the most culturally aware preachers in America. Much like Albert Mohler, Keller always provides clear and prolific analysis of worldviews. And boy does he bring the gospel heat! I have learned to listen to a Keller sermon nearly every morning, if for nothing else for the cultural insight and gospel hope. Keller clearly exposes the gospel in biblical and compelling ways. His preaching, much like John Piper’s, is modernly unparalleled.

So, for any serious preacher of the gospel, Keller’s book Preaching is an absolute must-have. Like all of Keller’s books, readers find rich gospel teaching and application. This book is the farthest thing from a how-to book, even though Keller does include an instruction guide for crafting an expository sermon in the appendix. It is more of a wise older man passing on his experience and wisdom to younger men in the ministry. Preaching offers much regarding his philosophy and theology of preaching, as well as pointed practical advice for effective preaching. Keller is a staunch defender and exemplary demonstrator of expository preaching. But what separates Preaching from most (if not all) works on the topic is Keller’s revelation of his insight into the modern mind. He basically teaches preachers how to speak intelligently and effectively to modern people. What I’m basically saying is chapter 5 is a gold mine. So many preachers fail to appeal to the secular mind. So much so that most secular people write off the church because they think the Bible is an ancient relic that “speaks” only to the unenlightened or easily manipulated.

Bless your pastor by getting him this book. Pastor, read this book! I’m confident God will use it to greatly impact and improve your preaching. Much of Keller’s book cannot be boiled down to a few quotable statements. Its richness demands to be read in context. With that said, here are twenty-five quotes from Keller’s Preaching because ten is just not enough.

25 Quotes from PreachingPreaching

1. To reach people gospel preachers must challenge the culture’s story at points of confrontation and finally retell the culture’s story, as it were, revealing how its deepest aspirations for good can be fulfilled only in Christ.

2. A good sermon is not like a club that beats upon the will but like a sword that cuts to the heart.

3. As we preach, we are to serve and love the truth of God’s Word and also to serve and love the people before us. We serve the Word by preaching the text clearly and preaching the gospel every time. We reach the people by preaching to the culture and to the heart.

4. You should be something like a clear glass through which people can see a gospel-changed soul in such a way that they want it too, and so that they get a sense of God’s presence as well.

5. Expository preaching is the best method for displaying and conveying your conviction that the whole Bible is true.

6. Only if we preach Christ every time can we show how the whole Bible fits together.

7. Every time you expound a Bible text, you are not finished unless you demonstrate how it shows us that we cannot save ourselves and that only Jesus can.

8. When the preacher solves Christians’ problems with the gospel–not by calling them to try harder but by pointing them to deeper faith in Christ’s salvation–then believers are being edified and nonbelievers are hearing the gospel, all at the same time.

9. The key to addressing at the same time both those who believe and those who do not–and even subgroups within cultures–is to go down to the heart level and call for gospel motivation in your preaching.

10. Only in Christ can any cultural plotline have a happy ending.

11. As you write the sermon, keep in mind the objections that skeptics would have to the teaching of a particular text, then take a moment to address them using agree-to-disagree reasoning.

12. The Christian preacher must be a critic of nonbelief. However, there is no virtue in being an unsympathetic one.

13. If you over-contextualize and compromise the actual content of the gospel, you will draw a crowd but no one will be changed…On the other hand, if you under-contextualize, so that your communication of the gospel is unnecessarily culturally alien and distant from the listeners, you will find that no one will be willing to hear you out.

14. If you don’t begin with the Bible, we will almost certainly come to superficial conclusions, having stacked the deck in favor of our own biases and assumptions.

15. Christianity is at the same time both far more pessimistic about history and the human race than any other worldview and far more optimistic about the material world’s future than any other worldview.

16. A Christian, as it were, arrives at far higher self-esteem by getting much lower self-esteem. Only if we repent and admit we are far worse than we ever imagined can we become justified, adopted, and united with Christ, and therefore far more loved and accepted than we ever hoped.

17. Let the biblical text control you, not your temperament. Learn to communicate “loud” truth as loud; “hard” truth as hard; and “sweet” truth as sweet.

18. There is no abstract, academic way to preach relevant, applicatory sermons. Application will naturally arise from your conversation partners.

19. Insightful preaching comes from depth of research and reading and experimentation.

20. As we preach we should always open ourselves to let the wonder sink in.

21. The essence of a good illustration is to evoke a remembered sense experience and bring it into connection with a principle.

22. Heart-moving preachers (in contrast to heart-manipulating ones) reveal their own affections without really trying to.

23. Your loves show what you actually believe in, not what you say you do.

24. The goal of the sermon cannot be merely to make the truth clear and understandable to the mind, but must also be to make it gripping and real to the heart. Change happens not just by giving the mind new arguments but also by feeding the imagination new beauties.

25. Whatever captures the heart’s trust and love also controls the feelings and behavior. What the heart most wants the mind finds reasonable, the emotions find valuable, and the will finds doable. It is all-important, then, that preaching move the heart to stop trusting and loving other things more than God.


396110_519885398036913_1852978654_nMathew Gilbert (B.A. Boyce College) is the Children’s Pastor at First Baptist Church in East Bernstadt, KY. He is the author of the forthcoming book Come to the Well: 50 Meditations to Fuel Your Joy in God. Mathew lives in London, KY with his wife, Erica, and their son, Jude Adoniram.

Quick Quotes: 10 Quotes from “The Abolition of Man” by C.S. Lewis

Q-train-logoEvery Friday, I plan to share select quotes from a book I am either currently reading or have previously read. Few things have impacted my faith and life as much as reading has. This will be just one way I promote books and reading. These articles will be for the dedicated reader who loves to gain insight from as many books as possible. They will also be for the Christian looking for new books to read. I am always on the lookout for new books to read. Hopefully some things I share will lead you to pick up a new book. Finally, these articles will be for those of you too busy to read. Hopefully these quick quotes will provide you with easy access to books you would otherwise not have time to read.
I’m beginning “Quick Quotes” with a look at one of my favorite authors and one of his most profound works. The Abolition of Man is a collection of essays from C.S. Lewis, and is arguably one of his most contemplative works. It has been ranked as one of the most important books of the 20th century. With Lewis’s typical conversational and meditational style, he approaches the reality of objective truth and how it plays out in our world.

Here are ten important quotes from The Abolition of Man:81aKy2m+SHL

1. The right defence against false sentiments is to inculcate just sentiments.

2. In a sort of ghastly simplicity we remove the organ and demand the function. We make men without chests and expect of them virtue and enterprise. We laugh at honour and are shocked to find traitors in our midst. We castrate and bid the geldings be fruitful.

3. All the values which he uses in attacking the Tao [Lewis’s word for objective truth], and even claims to be substituting for it, are themselves derived from the Tao.

4. An open mind, in questions that are not ultimate, is useful. But an open mind about the ultimate foundations either of Theoretical or of Practical Reason is idiocy.

5. Outside the Tao there is no ground for criticizing either the Tao or anything else.

6. What we call Man’s power over Nature turns out to be a power exercised by some men over other men with Nature as its instrument.

7. A dogmatic belief in objective value is necessary to the very idea of a rule which is not tyranny or an obedience which is not slavery.

8. There are progressions in which the last step is sui generis—incommensurable with the others—and in which to go the whole way is to undo all the labour of your previous journey. To reduce the Tao to a mere natural product is a step of that kind.

9. You cannot go on explaining away for ever: you will find that you have explained explanation itself away. You cannot go on seeing through things for ever. The whole point of seeing through something is to see something through it. It is good that the window should be transparent, because the street or garden beyond it is opaque.

10. It is no use trying to see through first principles. If you see through everything, then everything is transparent. But a wholly transparent world is an invisible world. To see through all things is the same as not to see.


396110_519885398036913_1852978654_nMathew Gilbert (B.A. Boyce College) is the Children’s Pastor at First Baptist Church in East Bernstadt, KY. He is the author of the forthcoming book Come to the Well: 50 Meditations to Fuel Your Joy in God. Mathew lives in London, KY with his wife, Erica, and their son, Jude Adoniram.

20 Healthy Quotes from Thabiti Anyabwile’s “What is a Healthy Church Member?”

517Y-rMS6oLLast week, I posted 25 quotes from Jonathan Leeman’s book, Church Membership. This week I will stay in the area of church membership and post some helpful quotes from Thabiti Anyabwile’s book on the topic.
Anyabwile is currently serving as assistant pastor for church planting at Capital Hill Baptist Church in Washington, DC. He is a council member for The Gospel Coalition. He has written numerous books such as Finding Faithful Elders and Deacons and Captivated. If you are not following him on Twitter or his blog, you should be.

Anyabwile has been very helpful for me, personally. His books have come at times when I have needed them and they have offered me timely encouragement. He engages the culture in his books and I am thankful to God for his work and ministry.

In What is a Healthy Church Member? Anyabwile tackles every aspect of life for a church member. I am pulling some quotes out of this book that have been beneficial for me, and I hope that they are beneficial for you as well.

1.If churches are to be healthy, then pastors and teachers must be committed to discovering the meaning of the Scripture and allowing that meaning to drive the agenda with their congregations.

2. Expositional listening gives us a clear ear with which to hear God.

3. Faithful men flourish at the fertile reception of the preached Word.

4. Every Christian is meant to be a theologian in the best and most intimate sense of the word.

5. The Christian who is interested in knowing his God is the Christian who wants to know what God says about himself in the Bible.

6. A healthy church member, committed to becoming a biblical theologian, will work to know the difference between beliefs that are essential to biblical Christianity and beliefs that are nonessential to the integrity and continuance of the faith.

7. Healthy church members will commit themselves to defending the essential things of the gospel (Phil. 1:27, Jude 3), while avoiding strife and contention over things that are not essential to the gospel.

8. The greatest need in the church today is the gospel.

9. The gospel is not only news for a perishing world, it is the message that forms, sustains, and animates the church.

10. Conversion is the radical turn from an enslaved life of pursuing sin to a free life of pursuing and worshipping God.

11. Conversion is a change so dramatic that it requires the intervention of God the Holy Spirit.

12. If our love of other Christians is cold, we need to examine whether or not we have ravingly believed on Christ Jesus the Son of God.

13. A healthy church member works to make sure that he himself is converted, but he also works to make sure that his evangelistic efforts are informed by a biblical understanding of conversion.

14. The local church is the place where love is most visibly and compellingly displayed among God’s people. It’s where the “body of Christ” is most plainly represented in the world.

15. Ministers of reconciliation must be patient and longsuffering.

16. Advancement in the knowledge and likeness of Christ, spiritual maturity and progress toward it, are supposed to be normal for the Christian.

17. A healthy church member has a pervasive concern for his or her own personal growth and the growth of other members of her or his church.

18. A healthy Christian relies more and more on the grace of God as it is communicated through the Word and the ordinances.

19. A healthy church member first gives himself to the Lord and then to the minister of the Lord, knowing that this is God’s will (2 Corin. 8:5).

20. Leadership in the local church is established by God for the blessing of his people.

You can purchase What is a Healthy Church Member? by clicking on the image of the book in this post.

Friends, buy the book. Read it. Use it. Become healthy church members for the sake of the gospel of Christ and for the glory of God!

You only get one life, and it will soon pass. Only what is done for King Jesus will last.


1557562_10153227664651515_1796309980_nEvan Knies is an undergraduate student at Boyce College where he studies Biblical and Theological Studies. He lives in Louisville, KY with his wife, Lauren. You can follow him on Twitter @Evan_Knies.