Morning Mashup 07/27

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A daily mashup of Kindle deals, articles, and videos for your information, edification, and enjoyment.


KINDLE DEALS

Preaching to a Post-Everything World: Crafting Biblical Sermons That Connect with Our Culture | Zack Eswine | $2.99

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Sex and the Supremacy of Christ | John Piper | $3.99

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ARTICLES

The Theology of Donald Trump | NY Times

After Mr. Trump met with hundreds of evangelical Christians a couple of weeks ago, James Dobson, who is among the most influentialleaders in the evangelical world and serves on Mr. Trump’s evangelical executive advisory board, declared that “Trump appears to be tender to things of the Spirit,” by which Dr. Dobson meant the Holy Spirit.

Of all the descriptions of Mr. Trump we’ve heard this election season, this may be the most farcical. As described by St. Paul, the “fruit of the Spirit” includes forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control, hardly qualities one associates with Mr. Trump. It shows you the lengths Mr. Trump’s supporters will go to in order to rationalize their enthusiastic support of him.

A Beginner’s Guide to ‘Free Will’ | Desiring God

My plea is that you focus on the actual teaching of the Scriptures. Try not to bring philosophical presuppositions to the text (presuppositions like: human accountability cannot coexist with God’s decisively working “all things according to the counsel of his will,” Ephesians 1:11). Let the Bible speak fully and deeply. Trust that someday we will no longer see in a mirror dimly, but face to face

Pray for the Police | Reformed African American Network

A question that Christians should be asking themselves during these troubling times is what does God’s word say is an appropriate posture toward the police or toward any institution or person who rules in authority over us? There are many different answers to this question. And, I would argue, that the answer that Christians apply from the many answers the Bible presents to us could vary based on the context and the social setting in which we find ourselves at a particular time in history. However, I think prayer is an answer that would always be applicable in any context.

Should I Correct a Foolish Person or Stay Silent? | One Degree to Another

We have all been there. Someone says something so outlandish and wrong that it must be answered. As you get ready to speak you realize they may not respond well to what you have to say. You think you have to speak up though, because this error must be answered. You feel the confusion and rage welling up within you. Any person who looked at you would know you are in the process of deciding whether you should continue to bite your tongue or not. What do you do? Do you speak or do you keep your mouth closed? And how do you decide which one is appropriate in this situation?

To Sow or to Reap: Four Theses on Social Conservatism | Mere Orthodoxy

This series was first published four years ago by Matthew Lee Anderson in the months leading up to the 2012 election. I had tentative plans to do a similar series this year, particularly after Michelle Obama’s opening-night speech at the DNC highlighted the enormous gap between the Democrats’ ability to give a positive vision of American and the GOP’s ability to do the same. But as I reviewed these posts by Matt, I decided that what he is saying here still basically applies. Indeed, if anything these posts should be read even more closely today in the aftermath of the Trump nomination. So over the next four days, we’ll be republishing Matt’s series of four theses on social conservatism. 

The Place for Children in Corporate Worship | Reformed Margins

What I intend to point out is that including children in corporate worship is immensely beneficial not only for the children, but also for the parents and for the church. In fact, unlike the common belief, this practice enhances the worship experience of the whole congregation.

Before You Post… | Reformation 21

Criticism is usually given much more freely on the internet than in person. It is one of the chief reasons why the internet seems to generate more heat than light. It is so easy to hit that “post” button when you don’t have to face that person’s reaction. In some ways, the internet can reveal our hearts better than personal interactions. This is why it is very important that we meditate on how to give and receive criticism. Proverbs tells us that the way we receive criticism marks us either as foolish or wise people.

VIDEOS

Shame the Strong or Influence the Influencers | TGC

 

How Political Should a Pastor Get With His Flock? | For the Church

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