Throwback Thursday: George Whitefield, Deism, and Cultural Impact

pgeorge-whitefieldIn the beginning of Arnold Dallimore’s volume 1 work on George Whitefield, he addresses the spiritual and moral corruption in Britain in the mid 1700s. Dallimore starts off this chapter by stating “The history of the eighteenth century demonstrates that true revival is the work of God-not man- of God who is not limited by such circumstances as the extent of human sin or the degree of mankind’s unbelief” (paraphrased, p. 19).
Dallimore displays in that chapter the rise of Deism and the questioning of Christianity. This century attacked the Bible, attacked pastors, and attacked Christ. But from these attacks from the end of the 1600s into the 1700s, there are men such as Bunyan, the Wesleys, Whitefield, and Edwards. These men stood on the solid foundation, preached the gospel, and changed the culture.

One could look at their generation, and our generation and see many similarities in moral and spiritual corruption. We need to preach the gospel. True revival is not the work of man, but of God. I hear from many men and women who say there is no hope in this generation, everything is going to hell in a hand basket, things are getting so bad. But then you look at previous generations and things weren’t so great.

Yeah, sure, things may be bad right now. Every generation has their problems, but they only have one Savior. We need to preach the gospel that changes lives. The gospel found in the scriptures. There is hope in Jesus! As Christians, Jesus transforms our thoughts, our actions, and our motives. So friends, be reminded of the gospel that has the power to save. Because you only get one life, and it will soon pass! Only what is done for Jesus Christ will last!


1557562_10153227664651515_1796309980_nEvan Knies is an undergraduate student at Boyce College where he studies Biblical and Theological Studies. He lives in Louisville, KY with his wife, Lauren. You can follow him on Twitter @Evan_Knies.

 

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